The Fox and the Crow: A Very Short Story for Kids with Pictures

Short Picture Books—Share the Love of Reading

Many kids love to hear short stories, like the story of the fox and the crow, and eagerly await story time. A good story holds universal appeal—and for children, pictures can make or break a book. The pictures help draw them into the story and understand it even if they cannot yet read all the words; the short format is perfect for short attention spans.

There is a huge number of such picture storybooks available for children of all ages—from toddlers, preschool children kindergarten to elementary school kids or even older. You can choose from short stories with morals, animal stories, fairy tales, tales of famous people, and simplified folk tales, just to name a few. Keep in mind your child’s reading ability while selecting a book. A picture book can stretch a child’s vocabulary since the pictures can help them guess words, but try not to select something too difficult. For young kids, there are many beautiful board books that are sturdy enough to resist rough handling by small kids.

Here is an online picture book for your little one to enjoy—the fable of the fox and the crow.

The Fox and the Crow

A classic children’s tale with a moral. It is also sometimes known as “The Crow and the Fox” or “The Crow and the Cheese.”

The fox and the crow—a short story for kids with pictures.
The fox and the crow—a short story for kids with pictures.
The crow and the cheese.
The crow and the cheese.

One day, Neelam the crow was flying over the trees. She was hungry. She was looking for something to eat. She found a piece of cheese under a tree. “How lucky I am!” said Neelam to herself.

She picked up the piece of cheese with her beak and flew to the top of the tree. “I shall eat this piece of cheese slowly,” said Neelam to herself. “I have not eaten cheese for a long time. I love cheese.”

The fox yearns for food.
The fox yearns for food.

Foxy the fox was walking near the tree. He too was hungry. “I have not eaten anything all day. I am so hungry. I hope I find something to eat,” thought Foxy.

The fox thinks hard.
The fox thinks hard.

Foxy saw Neelam sitting on the tree and he also saw the cheese. “I must get that piece of cheese from Neelam. But Neelam is very clever. I have to make Neelam drop the cheese.”

The clever fox makes a plan.
The clever fox makes a plan.

Foxy thought of a plan. He went to the tree where Neelam was sitting and said, “Oh, what a beautiful bird you are! I am sure you have a beautiful voice too. Why don’t you sing for me?”

The foolish crow tries to sing.
The foolish crow tries to sing.

Neelam was very happy when she heard these words. She forgot the cheese in her mouth. She opened her mouth to say, “Kaa-Kaa,” and the cheese fell down.

The fox eats the cheese that the foolish crow lost.
The fox eats the cheese that the foolish crow lost.

Foxy ate the cheese. He laughed at Neelam and said, “You have an ugly voice. I only wanted the cheese. You are a fool!”

Moral

What is the moral of this story? The foolish crow was so proud of its voice that it forgot it had a piece of cheese in its mouth! When the wily fox asks it to sing, praising its “beautiful” voice, the crow is so flattered, it forgets that its voice is actually hoarse. In order to show off its voice, it opens its mouth to sing. And it loses the cheese. Thus, this ancient but popular fable teaches us a valuable lesson and conveys an important moral about pride. Such simple kindergarten stories can teach us a lot. This short story with pictures thus can be both educative and entertaining!

Fable Video

A wide range of children’s stories are available online in video form, including examples of Aesop’s fables, Panchatantra tales, Jataka tales, tales from the Arabian Nights, fairy tales, and folk tales. Indeed, there is a wide range of educational videos that goes beyond animated stories. Children can learn rhymes and even watch preschool and kindergarten lessons.

Here is a video version of “The Fox and the Crow”:

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